Dying: The Process of Losing Energy

The energy of life from a biological standpoint is fascinating.  In short, humans receive energy from the sun and exert it mechanically, or as heat.  The easiest way to see death in terms of energy is that the body eventually stops moving and likewise ceases to produce heat.  These facts outlast death in the traditional sense—on a molecular level, energy transference occurs for quite some time after announcements of death.  Bodies require energy to perform cellular breakdown and support the spread of bacteria.

For further thought, decomposition occurring in nature prolongs the body as a source of energy.  The body becomes a host for insects and microbes, and in certain situations, consumed by various animals as well.  Thus after death, the energy continues to be transferred even if simply on a chemical or molecular level.  Leading into natural death there are signs of a change in the level of energy associated with the body; the bowels and blood circulation slow and there is a loss of appetite.  Pain medications consumed in the last days of life tend to exacerbate the symptoms of death.

An informed caregiver knows food and liquids are not welcomed by the dying, and this is a result of the physical changes a person goes through near death.  Those approaching death sleep as if they did when they arrived into the world—in other words, like a baby.  Although sleep requires energy, there is a distinct loss in probability that mechanical energy will be exerted, such as through physical movement.  Death is often associated with hospitals, hospices, and beds.  Though many hospitals and hospices have windows there is factually a reduction in exposure to natural light within the confines of a facility.

Beds are associated with sleep, rest, and a lack of activity.  Think about the term deathbed; a term that extends beyond the frame and mattress to include the last hours of life.  Human’s sleep when they are tired, which may often be referred to as having little or no energy.  The key question being whether the manner by which humans systematically deal with those near death make matters worse?

As humans transfer energy near death, they are likely not receiving energy from a source (e.g. food, liquids, and the sun).  Free energy maintains order and thus the loss of energy creates the aforementioned somatic issues and essentially disorder.  It is this lack of organization which begins to deny organ function and results in death.


Jordache Williams

Jordache Williams is currently based in Rock Hill, SC and is the Program Manager for Atlas Concepts, LLC.  He is a Certified Life Coach and holds a Master’s Degree in Human Services.

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